fenderlust:

Jimi Hendrix, Zurich. April 30th,’68

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shopjeen:

NEW STICKERS! SHOPJEEN.com

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#cat #food t #face

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WARNING FOR THOSE WITH OR RECOVERING FROM EATING DISORDERS, ESPECIALLY ONES WITH OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE HABITS, WHO ARE THINKING OF DOWNLOADING THE IOS 8 UPDATE. PLEASE REBLOG.

motivatedslacker:

nonbinaryparenting:

frilton:

The new IOS8 update contains an app named Health which CANNOT BE DELETED.

The app allows you to choose which aspects of your health you choose to monitor, but available categories include “Body Measurements”, which includes body weight, and “Fitness”, which contains sections for calories consumed and calories burned. 

While this may be useful for those looking to monitor their fitness, it could be triggering and harmful to those suffering with or in recovery from eating disorders, especially in sufferers with obsessive compulsive tendencies they find it very hard to abstain from, such as calorie counting, body measuring and weighing.

Whilst of course the app cannot force you to use it, it cannot be deleted, so will be present within your apps and can be a source of feelings of temptation to record numbers and of guilt and judgement for not using the app.

If you personally feel you could not emotionally handle the presence of this app,  and it would be detrimental to your recovery, please do not download IOS8. I do not know if a new IOS can be avoided permanently (if anyone has any information on this please do add it to the post), but if it cannot then please use the time you have to prepare yourself for the app, and to reinforce reminders that you do not have to calorie count, you do not have to weigh yourself, you do not owe proof of exercise to anyone, person or app.

reblog this please - it is so incredibly shitty of apple to do this

If you do want to download the new IOS but want to avoid the app, consider tucking it on a separate screen away from all your other apps, or create an “unused” category and toss it with the stocks app or something. Hopefully out of sight will eventually become out of mind. Take care of yourself.

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vicemag:

That women are pressured to be hairless, and men can do what they want and no one cares, is neither morally nor logically defensible. 

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drakeimpala:

this is one of the greatest interactions in human history

(via femmenatic)

#OHMYGOD WHERE IS THIS FROM IM FREAKING OUT #LOOK AT THOSE BABESm
"

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

"

-

Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday.

Saluden Muchachxs, saluden.

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